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Curtin University
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Change of course & unit codes for 2015

From the 2015 calendar year onward Curtin will be making changes to course, major, stream, unit and thesis codes so they are more intuitive and easier for you to use and search. The new codes will be a combination of letters and numbers that have meaning rather than a number that was generated automatically by our system.

What's changing?

The new codes will be a combination of letters and numbers that have meaning rather than a number that was generated automatically by our system.

If you have commenced your course prior to 2015 your course, major/stream code and title will not change. Those students commencing their course in 2015 will have a new course and major/stream code, however, the course content shouldn't change as part of the move to the new coding.

If you are currently studying at Curtin and commenced prior to 2015, all of the outstanding units on your study plan (excluding enrolled and completed units) will be updated to the new codes, in some cases you may even notice the titles of some units change.

Further information on the changes and whether they will affect you can be found below:

Changes to unit codes

Any units that are undertaken from 2015 onwards will use the new coding, regardless of whether you are a new student or continuing in your current course. The new unit code has been designed with a specific meaning and will be in the format:

  • AAAANNNN

The 'AAAA' is the area of study of the unit and can be four letters in length for units, for example:

  • ACCT = Accounting
  • ASTR = Astronomy
  • GEOL = Geology

The full list of areas of study used in the new coding system can be downloaded for your reference.

The 'NNNN' in the second part of the code is a number, where the first number reflects the year level, followed by an additional three numbers in sequence, for example:

  • 1000 = First year unit
  • 1002 = First year unit
  • 3001 = Third year unit

Combining the unit area of study and the year level and sequential numbers will come up with the meaningful unit code, examples are below:

  • ACCT2002 = Management Accounting
  • ASTR1001 = Introduction to Astronomy
  • GEOL3004 = Geology Topics

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Changes to course codes

If you have commenced your course prior to 2015, your course code and title will not change.

The new course code has been designed with a specific meaning and will be in the format:

  • CL-AAAAAAA

The 'CL' at the beginning of the new course code is the course or degree classification, for example:

  • B = Bachelor Degree
  • GC = Graduate/Postgraduate Certificate
  • MR = Masters by Research

There are a large number of different course or degree classifications, the full list of course or degree classifications used in the new coding system can be downloaded for your reference.

The 'AAAAAAA' is the area of study of the course and can be four to seven letters in length, for example:

  • ACCT = Accounting
  • ASTR = Astronomy
  • GEOL = Geology

The full list of areas of study used in the new coding system can be downloaded for your reference.

Combining the course classification and area of study will come up with the meaningful course code, examples are below:

  • B-COMM = Bachelor of Commerce
  • GC-PRJMGT = Graduate Certificate in Project Management
  • MR-NURS = Master of Philosophy (Nursing) by Research

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Changes to majors/stream codes

If you have commenced your major/stream prior to 2015, your major/stream code and title will not change.

The new major/stream code and titles have been designed with a specific meaning and will be in the format:

  • TTTT-AAAAA

The 'TTTT' at the beginning of the new code is the major/stream type of specialisation, for example:

  • MJRU = Major (Undergraduate)
  • MJRP = Major (Postgraduate)
  • MDDU = Major Double Degree (Undergraduate)
  • STRP = Stream (Postgraduate)

There is a range of different specialisation classifications; the full list of specialisations (majors, streams and minors) used in the new coding system can be downloaded for your reference.

The same as courses, the 'AAAAA' is the area of study of the major/stream and will be five letters in length, for example:

  • ACCTG = Accounting
  • ACBLW = Accounting and Business Law
  • CMPRC = Corporate Media Production

Combining the major/stream specialisation and area of study will come up with the meaningful major/stream code, examples are below:

  • MJRU-ACCTG = Accounting Major
  • MJDU-ACBLW = Accounting and Business Law Double Major
  • STRP-CMPRC = Corporate Media Production Stream (Grad Cert)

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Changes to thesis codes

Thesis codes will utilise the same format and meaning as unit code and will be in the format:

  • AAAANNNN

The 'AAAA' is the area of study and can be four letters in length for thesis, for example:

  • ACCT = Accounting
  • ASTR = Astronomy
  • GEOL = Geology

The full list of areas of study used in the new coding system can be downloaded for your reference.

The 'NNNN' in the second part of the code is a number, where the first number reflects the year level, followed by an additional three numbers in sequence, for example:

  • 1000 = First year unit
  • 1002 = First year unit
  • 3001 = Third year unit

Combining the thesis area of study and the year level and sequential numbers will come up with the meaningful thesis code, examples are below:

  • ACCT6000 = Master Thesis - Accounting
  • GEOL7000 = Doctoral Thesis - Geology

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Why is it changing?

The University has undertaken to implement the new coding system as it will enable a number of benefits:

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How will it affect me?

As the changes are coming in for the 2015 calendar year, most of the changes will only affect new students or students switching to a course in 2015.

Course and major/streams codes will not be changed for any student who commenced their course prior to 2015 and will continue in the same course version for the remainder of their studies.

Unit and theses, however, will change for students who are currently in a course. All of the outstanding units and theses on study plans (excluding enrolled and completed units) will be updated to the new codes, and some titles may also be updated. So any units studied from 2015 onwards will use the new coding.

A search tool has been created to allow you to easily see what the new unit codes used to be. Use the search tool to find out what your units used to be called.

Other Frequently Asked Questions

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